Reactions to the Indian Supreme Court’s Ruling Upholding an Anti-Gay Law

India

Political leaders, human rights advocates and editorial boards around the world have condemned a ruling from India’s highest court that upheld an anti-gay law known as Section 377. The law bans certain sexual acts that are supposedly “against the order of nature,” including private consensual sexual relationships between adults of the same sex.

The Indian Supreme Court’s ruling means that Section 377 will remain in effect until the nation’s legislature repeals it or until court litigants devise an additional or alternative legal strategy with a better chance of success. Both approaches face major hurdles, though the fight is hardly over.

Click here or on ‘Read More’ to read the full post and to see a video of a U.S. State Department representative’s reaction to the ruling.

Nov. 18 Marks 10 Years Since the Demise of Section 28

UK Map with Flag

Today marks ten years since the repeal of Section 28.

Enacted by Margaret Thatcher’s government in 1988, the British law prohibited schools from “teaching …. the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship.” It also barred schools from “intentionally promot[ing] homosexuality or publish[ing] material with the intention of promoting homosexuality.”

An effort to get rid of the noxious law gained strength in the early 2000s, and on November 18, 2003, a bill repealing Section 28 finally went into effect.