Tag Archives: Stereotypes

North Carolina on Green School Chalkboard

Earlier this week, I published a post and video about a brave nine-year-old, Grayson Bruce, who had spoken out publicly against bullying after getting verbally and physically attacked at his North Carolina school. Other kids had picked on him relentlessly because they thought his My Little Pony bag was “girlie.” And to make matters worse, school administrators initially responded by telling Grayson not to wear the bag, saying it was the “trigger for bullying.” (Check out my original post for further thoughts on that.)

Fortunately, the school has changed course (though it took a national outcry) and will allow Grayson to wear his bag. Administrators have published the following statement from Grayson’s mother, Noreen Bruce, on the district’s Facebook page:

Click here or on ‘Read More’ to view the full post.

Gavel

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) announced a new lawsuit today over anti-LGBT mistreatment at school: The organization is suing Mississippi’s Moss Point School District, the district’s school board, and two district administrators on behalf of a student, Destin Holmes, “who endured such severe harassment she was eventually driven out of school.” Click here or on ‘Read More’ to learn more and to watch a related video.

Texas Flag

Two days after receiving a demand letter from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) threatening litigation, the La Feria Independent School District in Texas has agreed to allow a transgender senior, Jeydon Loredo, to appear in his high school’s yearbook wearing a tuxedo.

The district’s superintendent had previously told Jeydon’s mother, Stella Loredo, that her son’s tuxedo photograph would offend “community standards”; the superintendent explained to Ms. Loredo that the school would include her son’s photograph in the yearbook only if he wore stereotypically feminine attire, like a blouse.

Yesterday’s Related Youth Allies Post: Texas Teen’s Fight Serves As Important Reminder: Federal Law Protects Trans Youth.
Click here or on Read More to view the full post.

Hesperia Schools Facing Anti-LGBT Discrimination Claims are in San Bernandino County, Pictured Here

The district is in San Bernardino County, shown here in red.


[November 19, 2013, update: Lambda Legal has sued the district on behalf of a lesbian teacher. The original March 19 post appears below.]

Unless they act quickly and decisively, officials in yet another school district may face a lawsuit from LGBT youth and their allies. And if they’re sued, the officials could easily lose.

According to a letter sent yesterday to the interim superintendent of Hesperia Unified School District in California, the district faces potential legal action by the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and the law firm of Nixon Peabody LLP on behalf of student members of a gay-straight alliance (GSA) at the district’s Sultana High School.

The letter from the ACLU and Nixon Peabody demands that the district commit to a series of corrective actions by March 25 to address anti-LGBT discrimination, harassment, and censorship at the high school. The letter also proposes some long-term measures.

While schools should always take demand letters like this seriously, a couple of factors should create a particular sense of urgency for school officials in this case. Click here or on ‘Read More’ to see the full post.

LGBT Youth Allies’ Global News Roundup #8

Posted by MK on Sep 21, 2012 @ 1:14 pm
Russian LGBT Equality Advocate Nikolai Alexeyev, Arrested in 2010

Nikolai Alexeyev, pictured here in 2010, has been a tireless advocate for LGBT equality in Russia


In today’s LGBT Youth Allies Global News Roundup, we’ve linked to stories from, among other places, Arizona, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Dominica, France, Malaysia, New Zealand and Russia. Read the full post

Rupert Everett Photo from 2007

Rupert’s mother would like him to have a “pretty wife.”

Openly gay actor Rupert Everett’s remark in a newspaper interview that he “can’t think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads” has sparked outrage in many circles—and rightly so. This anti-gay-parent comment, which ignores decades of research on same-sex parents, comes from a gentleman whose mother said as part of the same interview that she still wishes Rupert, who has been out for 20 years, had “a pretty wife.” Does anybody else see any irony here?  Read the full post

Sally Ride, Boy Scouts, and Role Models for LGBT Youth

Posted by MK on Jul 30, 2012 @ 3:33 am
Sally Ride in 1979, Photo

Sally Ride in 1979

Posted by MK on 7/30/12

I’ll add only a couple of points to the debate swirling around Sally Ride’s decision to come out in her obituary. As many readers already know, the late physicist and astronaut Sally Ride–who overcame countless challenges to become the first American woman in outer space in 1983–revealed recently that she was in a same-sex relationship, by way of an obituary that she co-wrote with her partner before she passed away. The obituary noted that Dr. Ride is survived by “Tam O’Shaughnessy, her partner of 27 years.”

Debate continues about whether Dr. Ride came out too late, whether she should have come out at all, whether she would want to be an “icon” for the LGBT community, and other matters. I won’t join all of these debates, but I’ll add my two cents on a couple issues.

First, I take issue with the many commentators who insist with surprising confidence that Dr. Ride would not have wanted to be celebrated as a hero to the LGBT community. Read more…

LGBT Youth, Sex Discrimination, and 40 Years of Title IX

Posted by MK on Jul 13, 2012 @ 6:30 am
Roman Numberal IX

This summer marks forty years of Title IX, the landmark federal law banning sex discrimination in federally funded schools and other education programs. President Nixon signed Title IX into law in June of 1972.

Title IX: 1970s photo of Sen. B. Bayh

Former Indiana Senator Birch Bayh, pictured here in a snazzy track suit with female athletes in the 1970s, was an architect and chief proponent of Title IX.

Much if not most of the media coverage of the law’s fortieth anniversary has, understandably, focused on the law’s achievements in opening opportunities for women, especially in school athletics. (Some news outlets have noted, by the way, that this summer, women will for the first time outnumber men on the U.S. Olympic team.) But the anniversary also provides a reason to reflect on how Title IX—and other sex-discrimination laws—have helped LGBT youth in schools. Read more…